Monthly Archives: August 2011

Nielsen: Lær mig nattens stjerne

2
August 3, 2011

lær mig nattens stjerneWhen I first came to Denmark one of my greatest pleasures was learning about Carl Nielsen's music. Nielsen (1865-1931) is undoubtedly the Danish composer who had the deepest influence on 20th century Danish musical life. Mention his name here and people immediately think of his symphonies, concertos and chamber music to say nothing of his works for piano and his two operas one of which "Maskerade" ("Masquerade") became Denmark's "national" opera. He also wrote a large number of Danish songs and hymns which were known and loved by his contemporaries and their children many of whom sang them at school morning assembly. These songs and hymns are less well known now, which is a shame as many are truely lovely.  For this posting I've picked a performance of the beautiful song "Lær mig nattens stjerne" by one of my favourite Danish choirs the Kammerkoret Trinitatis Kantori  ("Trinitatis Kantori Chamber Choir").

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Stockholms Gosskör: Vi är blommor

0
August 3, 2011

Stockholms Gosskör (Stockholms Boys Choir) singing Georg Riedel's setting of Barbro Lindgren's poem "Vi är blommor" ("We are flowers"). The recording is from their Spring 2010 concert. Lyrics below the video. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

 


Lyrics

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

‪La tragique histoire du petit René

0
August 2, 2011

The children of La Maîtrise de la Cathédrale de Cambrai conducted by Yannick Lemaire recount for us little René's tragic story as told by Jean Nohain (Jean Marie Le Grand) and set to music by Francois Poulenc. The recording is from the Gala Concert presented by the Northern Branch of the Choral Federations "Pueris Cantores" in the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Grâce de Cambrai, Cambrai, Nord, France on June 5th 2011. Lyrics are below the video. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Caresse sur l’Ocean : Les Petits Chanteurs De Saint Marc

0
August 2, 2011

You probably know this song from the film "Les Choristes" the Petits Chanteurs De Saint Marc were the choir who sang in that film. The soloist Jean Baptiste Maunier played Morhange. Lyrics are in the video. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

Manuel Cardoso (1566-1650) – Requiem

0
August 1, 2011

screenshot_cardoso_requiem_tallis_scholars

Manuel Cardoso was born in Fronteira, in southern Portugal, in 1566 and died in 1650. A Carmelite friar who had studied liturgical and choir  music at the Colégio dos Moços do Coro under Manuel Mendes and Cosme Delgado. Together with With Duarte Lobo and John IV of Portugal  he's considered to represent the "golden age" of Portuguese polyphony. This school together with the English and the Polish continued to support composers of unaccompanied choral music  long after the Italians and the French had moved on. That isn't to say they weren't influenced by the newer style they were, Cardoso's music for example is clearly influenced by Baroque music which makes for some interesting and very lovely music. In this  requiem you can hear suggestions of Baroque harmony right from the start yet the polyphony could well have been written a hundred years previously.  It's a piece that's well worth listening with long melodic lines and the chant being carried by the sopranos rather than the tenors. If you haven't heard Cardoso before but like choral music you'll find the time listening to this is well spent. Don't let the fact that it's a requiem put you off either it's a serene piece of music  sung with conviction by The Tallis Scholars' whose singing sunshine is enchanced by the acoustic of the Church of Sts. Peter and Paul, Norfolk. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

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