John Taverner (±1490—1545): Alleluia. Veni, electa mea

Painting: Enthroned Virgin and Child, with Four Donors Artist: Andrea Solari (1460–1524)  Date: ±1490-1493 Technique: Oil on panel, transferred to canvas Location: Philadelphia Museum of Art

Painting: Enthroned Virgin and Child, with Four Donors
Artist: Andrea Solari (1460–1524)
Date: ±1490-1493
Technique: Oil on panel, transferred to canvas
Location: Philadelphia Museum of Art

I’ve not been able to find out anything about when Taverner composed this or for whom. Taverner set the Alleluia and its melismatic extension but left the rest to the singers. He could do that because the convention at the time was that the same polyphony would be used for the choral part of the verse. It’s an interesting and beautiful piece of music performed here by The Sixteen under Harry Christophers as it would have been sung in Taverner’s time – which is why you can hear two voices singing the solos. The upper voice sings the chant melody while the lower three after singing a small amount of imitation sing free counterpoint that’s characterised by its variation and use of rhythm there are some very nice overlapping scales sung in the climactic passages. Enjoy :-).

mfi

John Taverner (±1490—1545):  Alleluia. Veni, electa mea

Alleluia. Veni, electa mea,
et ponam te in thronum meum:
quia concupivit rex: speciem tuam.
Alleluia. Come, my chosen one,
and I will place you on my throne:
because the king desired: your beauty.

Performers: The Sixteen conducted by Harry Christophers.

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