Blog Archives

markfromireland

William Byrd (±1539-1623): Domine ante te omne desiderium

0
August 29, 2014

This terse but wonderful six-part setting of two verses from Psalm 37 (Psalm 38 in protestant Bibles) is an early piece which exists only in manuscript. I love how the first verse is so … … … tenative and how it gathers pace, and conviction, as Byrd moves the motet forward to describing in music the Psalmist's feelings.
Enjoy :-)

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Antonio Vivaldi (1678-1741): Canta in prato, ride in monte RV623

0
August 28, 2014

This wonderfully joyful composition is another one of Vivaldi's 'Roman' motets, I think he must have composed it for one of the soloists in his operas it's certainly in a very operatic style and lets a talented singer show off without having to work terribly hard to do so. Robert King describes it as 'Vivaldi at his most beguiling and uncomplicated' and really that sums it up nicely. It's a charming piece replete with nightingale trills and evocations of rustic flutes sung below by Anke Herrmann (soprano) accompaned by the Academia Montis Regalis conducted by Alessandro de Marchi. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Dilectus meus mihi

0
August 27, 2014

'My beloved is mine' is the seventeenth of Palestrina's motets in the set of twenty-nine that set verses from the Song of Songs. As with all these settings Palestrina's setting is very concise and in some ways quite plain the better to make it easily performable by groups of varying compositions and levels of ability. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Bo Hansson (1950 – ): Slowly rises the narrow whirl of longing

2
August 26, 2014

Breathlessly we will taste the words that never
Burned on our tongue

Hansson set Hultman Löfvendahl's Swedish language poem Den plats bland träden (The place amongst the trees) in 2000 for the Stockholm Musikgymnasiums Kammarkör. Both he and the poet were happy with the work and collaborated on this English language version of the piece. It's a comment on the increasing transience of modern human interaction and communication that starts very very quietly and then oh so gently and gradually building layer upon layer of sound and tempo around a rising central pitch transforms itself several times over. Each transformation is more intense – and transient, than the last rather like much in modern life. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

William Byrd (±1539-1623): Nunc Dimittis from the Great Service

0
August 25, 2014

Byrd's settings for the Great Service took Anglican music forward from its hesitant and somewhat experimental phase into somewhat more splendid territory. He probably wrote the Magnificat (about which I wrote last Friday see: William Byrd (±1539-1623): Magnificat from the Great Service | Saturday Chorale) and the Nunc Dimittis last it's beautiful music which manages to obey the requirement that the text should be set clearly while making use of juxtaposition and contrast to great dramatic effect. It's been described as the 'finest unaccompanied setting of the Service in the entire repertory of English church music' I have to say I agree. Enjoy :-)-

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Archives

Special Pages