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markfromireland

How much is that doggy in the …

3
May 29, 2013

O quam gloriosum by Victoria, being sung in Canterbury Cathedral by St Stephen's Church Choir, Canterbury. The choir were right up in the far East End of the cathedral by this point, which is why it sounds rather distant. Watch out for the dog coming into the Quire at around 1'40"!

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Petits Chan­teurs À La Croix De Bois – Greensleeves – Soloist Baudoin Aube

0
May 29, 2013

Baudoin Aube was one of the great boy sopranos of his generation. Now at fourteen and a half his voice has matured into a beautiful baritone range. One can only hope that after he finishes with his choir Les Petits Chanteurs a la Croix de Boise (PCCB) in July 2013 that he continues to sing as his baritone voice has wonderful potential.

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Estêvâo De Brito (±l575-1641): Salve Regina –

2
May 28, 2013

Estêvâo De Brito (cl575-1641) was a Portuguese musician who spent most of his working career in Spain. According to Barbosa Machado he studied music with Filipe de Magalhães. Whatever the truth of that he was evidently sufficiently well thought of to be formally appointed maestro de capilla of Badajoz Cathedral in 1597. Six years later on 16 February 1613 he was elected over five other candidates to the post of maestro de capilla of Málaga Cathedral. In January 1618 he was offered the post of maestro de capilla of the Madrid royal chapel, but he refused the appointment preferring to remain as maestro de capilla of Málaga Cathedral which post he held until his death.

His setting of the Salve takes the familiar melody of the antiphon paraphrases it, and uses it imitatively for each of the polyphonic verses climaxing in the final line 'O clemens, O pia, O dulcis Virgo Maria', where you can hear the chant in a high register in the soprano line.

markfromireland

I really don't have anything much to add my YouTube introduction to De Brito's setting of the Salve other than to say that it's particularly beautiful example of the genre that I listen to regularly. Oh, and of course: Enjoy :-)

mfi

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Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611): Veni Creator Spiritus

0
May 27, 2013

Victoria set many hymns amongst them this four-part (SATB) setting of the Office hymn for Pentecost 'Veni creator spiritus' which literally translates as 'Come creator spirit' but is often translated as 'Come, Holy Ghost, Creator, come'. Listening to it may be the cause of some surprise amongst those who associate Victoria only with the austere beauty of his settings of of the Requiem and the Holy Week texts. To be sure Veni creator spiritus begins sternly but this soon yields to a beautiful arrangement in which Victoria's polyphonic setting of the even verses reveal a complex and sophisticated series of contrasts which become ever more refined as the hymn progresses in its sonorous beauty. It's sung below by the Sixteen conducted by Harry Christophers. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): – The Church Year – Trinity Sunday: Die Elenden sollen essen (The miserable shall eat) BWV 75

2
May 26, 2013
This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): – The Church Year

Bach 150x150 captionedOn May 22, 1723 Bach moved to Leipzig to take up his position as the newly-elected Kantor at the Thomasschule and although he wasn't formally installed until June 1st he apparently started work immediately, for on Sunday May 30th the first performance of one of his large-scale Cantatas took place to great applause. The Cantata in question which is in two parts was 'Die Elenden sollen essen' (The miserable shall eat) BWV 75 the anonymous text to which is based on Luke 16:19-31 – the parable of the rich man and Lazarus . It's one of my favourite Cantatas, Bach was determined to start his tenure at Leipzig with a display of musical fireworks and he certainly succeeded. It's huge (if you count up 'Die Elenden sollen essen's' sections – or movements if you prefer to call them that, you'll find no less than fourteen separate movements). Not only is it huge but Bach filled it  choc-a-bloc with musical inventiveness, some wonderful arias, ditto recitatives, and that's before I mention the simply superb orchestral writing. The cumulative effect of all of this is a thrilling and dramatic piece of music.

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