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markfromireland

C. V. Stanford (1852 – 1924): Service in B flat, Op 10 – Nunc dimittis, ‘Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace’

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September 5, 2013

Standford Sketch 150x200

Stanford's gentle and meditative setting of the Nunc dimittis for his Service in B flat, Op 10 is notable for its scoring for tenor and bass voices only until the gloria. You'll find it below sung by the Westminster Abbey Choir conducted by James O'Donnell. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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C. V. Stanford (1852 – 1924): Service in B flat, Op 10 – Magnificat, ‘My soul doth magnify the Lord’

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September 4, 2013

Standford Sketch 150x200 Stanford composed his Service in B flat, Op 10, in 1879 during his time as Organist at Trinity College, Cambridge, it's a pioneering piece of music in which Stanford did something quite new to English choral music at the time which was to apply Brahmsian symphonic technique to sacred choral music thereby giving it a cohesiveness and interest that make it stand out from  the run-of-the-mill choral music which was the staple of contemporaneous English church music. It's sung below by the Westminster Abbey Choir, conducted by James O'Donnell. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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The Marian Music of Tomás Luis de Victoria Part 10: Ave Maria a 8

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September 3, 2013
This entry is part 10 of 15 in the series Introducing The Marian Music of Tomás Luis de Victoria

Madonna with the Child (Luis de Morales circa 1520-1586) Unlike the four-part setting of the Ave Maria for four voices Victoria's eight-part setting for double choir (SATB + SATB) is undoubtedly by him. It was first published in Venice in 1572 and Victoria – ever the perfectionist edited no less than eight times for re-publication the last time in 1600. I've sometimes seen it described as a 'sumptuous' piece of music and 'sumptuous' is the perfect word for it. It's a splendid piece of music with a great sense of spaciousness every note of which I love from the . Victoria wrote it in a very effective antiphonal style in which homophonic and polyphonic passages alternate creating a dialogue between the two choirs. It's a deceptively simple piece of music where as Ignacio Alcala puts it "the chiarouscuros suggested by the staves acquire a special significance and endow the score with feeling and with passion". It's sung below by the Capella de Ministrers conducted by their founder Carles Magraner. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Esteban Salas (1725 – 1803): Alleluja. Confitemini Domino – YouTube

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September 2, 2013

The son of natives of the Canary Islands Esteban Salas was born in Havana on Christmas day 1725 he received his earliest music instruction as a boy chorister in the church of San Cristóbal (now Havana's cathedral) and enrolled at the local seminary aged fifteen to study for the priesthood. However his father's death forced him to leave the seminary and support his mother and siblings from his earnings as organist and choir director at San Cristóbal. He soon came to the attention of the bishop who appointed him music director of Santiago de Cuba Cathedral he composed more than ninety liturgical pieces and a large number of villancicos, cantatas and pastorelas, which were used during the Christmas season. His 'Alleluja. Confitemini Domino' which you can hear below performed by the Cuban choir Camerata Vocale Sine Nomine conducted by Teresa Paz is a fine example of late baroque South American music. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Documentary Series BBC Symphony: 3/4 New Nations and New Worlds – YouTube

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September 1, 2013

The third in a series of four documentaries from the BBC in which Simon Russell Beale explores the symphony. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

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