Blog Archives

markfromireland

Philippe Rogier (±1561-1596): Caligaverunt oculi mei

0
April 18, 2014

Rogier was a Flemish composer who started his musical career at the Spanish court as one of the choirboys recruited by Philip II's maestro de capilla Geert van Turnhout. During his all-too-short life he rose to become the Emperor's maestro de capilla himself. His music with its unusual dissonances, striking accidentals, and unexpected suspensions can sound surprisingly modern as can his sudden harmonc shifts – all of these techniques are used in Caligaverunt oculi mei to express both grief and remorse and it ends with a plainitive cry of the bereft Rogier mourning our crucified Lord – Videte omnes populi, si dolor similis sicut dolor meus,  (See, all you people, whether any grief can be compared to mine).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla (± 1590 -1664): Lamentation for Maundy Thursday, ‘Incipit lamentatio Jeremiae Prophetae’

2
April 17, 2014

For this year's Maundy Thursday I've chosen Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla's setting of Lectio I (Incipit Lamentatio Ieremiae prophetae) of the Lamentations for Maundy Thursday 'In Coena Domini'. It's a six-part setting and as you might expect from de Padilla it's very traditional in tone with it's polyphony being firmly based on the Toledo Lamentation tone and uses very fluid and sad vocalisations for the Hebrew letters—Aleph, Beth, and Gimel between the verses. It's sung below, superbly as always, by the Westminster Cathedral Choir conducted by James O'Donnell.

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

George Malcolm (1917-1997): Miserere mei Deus

2
April 16, 2014

Psalm 51 – the Miserere, is the Biblical text around which the Ash Wednesday liturgy revolves. George Malcolm's setting (Malcolm was Master of Music at Westminster Cathedral between 1947 and 1959) is an alternatim setting of the Psalm. It's a beautiful piece of work that deserves to be far better known in which Malcolm switches between the higher and lower voices in an unadorned second mode chant which he offsets with polyphonic expansions and variations. The voices join together for the second half of the Gloria  in a descant of great power and beauty.

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Orlande de Lassus (±1530-1594): Timor et tremor

0
April 15, 2014

De Lassus' six-part motet Timor et tremor is a complex and rewarding piece in which De Lassus trys – I think successfully, to portray musically emotional insecurity. Its use of disjunction makes it a beast to sing at all let alone to sing well which is why I greatly admire this performance of it by The Choir of St John’s College, Cambridge, under their conductor Andrew Nethsingha.

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

William Byrd (±1539-1623): O God, the proud are risen against me

0
April 14, 2014

In his note to this wonderfully imposing six-part anthem Peter Phillips speculates that it echoes the sentiment felt by Queen Elizabeth I 'when faced with the Northern Rebellion of 1569, or the Babington plot to assassinate her in 1586'. Maybe so but somehow I doubt it, I think it far more likely that it's an example of Byrd crying to God against the persecution of his faith by Ekizabeth's government. Whatever the truth of the matter it's a glorious piece of music that's gloriously well sung below by the Tallis Scholars. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Archives

Special Pages