Robert White (±1538-1574): Magnificat

When Morley, was writing his A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke (1597) he listed White as one of the greatest English composers saying that he was equal to de Lassus and included him in a list of seven eminent Tudor composers that included "Fayrfax, Taverner, Sheppard, Whyte, Parsons and Mr Byrd." Whenever I…

Jean Lhéritier (±1480—±1552): Miserere mei, Domine

Jean Lhéritier is reputed to have been one of Josquin’s students although the only evidence for this comes from the fact that a contemporary – Giovanthomaso Cimello said he was one of Josquin’s followers. If Lhéritier did have any direct contact with Josquin then it can only have taken place in France during Josquin’s term…

Jacob Handl (1550–1591): Missa Super Sancta Maria

Despite his relatively short life, Handl musical output was vast around five hundred works known to be by him survive most of these are religious works and the overwhelming majority of them three hundred and seventy four motets scored for between four and twenty-four voices are to be found in his four volume Opus musicum.…

William Mundy (±1529-1591): Adolescentulus sum ego

This six-part through-composed votive antiphon sets Psalm 118:141-142 in the Vulgate1 . It’s a bit scaled down but still very substantial in terms of its structure and its musical texture which consists of very tightly woven imitative polyphony gets ever richer as the motet progresses. It’s more proof, if proof were needed, that Mundy was…

Robert White (±1538-1574): Tota pulchra es

When Robert White died at the age of thirty six during one of the many outbreaks of plague that London was subject to at the time Robert Dow made a copy of all his motets and added this epitaph ‘Greatest glory of our muses, White: you perish, but your muse remains for ever’ nor was…

William Mundy (±1529-1591): Adhaesit pavimento

William Mundy’s six-part (SSATBB) psalm motet Adhaesit pavimento sets verses from psalm 119 (118 in the Vulgate) gets its name from verse twenty five Adhaesit pavimento anima mea (My soul has cleaved to the dust) which is its first line. English composers of Mundy’s generation were well aware of Josquin’s psalm settings and sought to…