Posts Tagged ‘ Advent ’

Advent Carol: O Come, O Come, Emmanuel — Boys Air Choir

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December 24, 2013

The Advent hymn "O Come, O Come, Emmanuel" is a reworking in English of the seven O Antiphons. It's one of the best-loved English language advent carols. Although few who sing it sing more than the famous 'O Come, O Come, Emmanuel' verse. This recording is perhaps my favourite it's by the Boys Air Choir. The third verse incidentally is sung by Elizabeth Burrowes who as I'm sure you'll agree sings quite as beautifully as her brothers. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Advent Antiphons 2013: O Emmanuel

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December 23, 2013

The final antiphon is sung on December 23rd 'Emmanuel' means 'God with us' and the antiphon draws heavily on Isaiah 7:14:

Propter hoc dabit Dominus ipse vobis signum ecce virgo concipiet et pariet filium et vocabitis nomen eius Emmanuhel

Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign. Behold a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son and his name shall be called Emmanuel.

markfromireland

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Advent Antiphons 2013: O Rex Gentium

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December 22, 2013

This antiphon hails Christ as the King and asks him to speed his return and save his people, Chilcott's setting expresses perfectly the text's sense of longing and hope. The antiphon's source texts are Isaiah 2:4; 11:10, Psalm 47:8, Jeremiah 10:7, Daniel 7:14, Haggai 2:8, Romans 15:12, and Ephesians 2:14, 20.

markfromireland

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Fourth Sunday in Advent 2013: Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Canite tuba

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December 22, 2013

Palestrina's setting of Canite tuba (Sound the trumpet), a motet for the fourth Sunday of Advent, was first published in Venice in 1572 in his second book of motets for five, six and eight voices. it's a beautifully crafted piece of music that perfectly expresses the sentiments of its texts ranging from the expansiveness of its opening line 'Canite tuba in Sion, quia prope est dies Domini' (Sound the trumpet in Sion, for the day of the Lord is nigh) to the mingled hope and pleading  of the final 'veni Domine et noli tardare' (come, O Lord, and be not tardy). Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Advent Antiphons 2013: O Oriens

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December 21, 2013

At the time these antiphons were writtten the celebrant and congregation would face East at certain points in the the Mass symbolising their expectation of Christ's return and during Advent of his birth. This antiphon which is sung on the day of the winter solstice – the shortest day and longest night of the year, speaks both to the return of the Saviour and the knowledge that henceforth the days will become brighter and warmer. The texts upon which the antiphon is based are: Isaiah 9:1; 58:8; 60:18-20, Malachi 4:2, Luke 1:78-79, John 8:12, Revelation 22:16.

markfromireland

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