Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625): This is the record of John

Gibbons’ anthem for five voices (SAATB or ATTBB) This is the record of John is a wonderful example of  the verse anthem. It consists of solos that alternate with full choral passages in which the choir repeats the words of the preceding solo section. The writing for the soloist is almost declamatory – Timothy Dickey…

Thomas Weelkes (1576-1623): Rejoice in the Lord

The first time I heard Weelkes’ setting of verses 1, 2 and 4 of Psalm 33 (the text of verse 2 is slightly adapted) I was surprised at how severely plain and unadorned it was –  not in Weelkes’ normal style at all. It’s a Full anthem for four voices (SATB) and organ with some…

John Sheppard (±1515-1558): Haste Thee O God (attr.)

Compared to that other Tudor-era composers Sheppard’s music is still relatively little known and infrequently performed which is perhaps why this recording of Haste the, O God, a setting of Psalm 70 generally attributed to Sheppard is the first ever recording of it. It’s also been attributed to Tye but it sounds more like Sheppard…

Edward Elgar (1857-1934): Great is the Lord Op 67

Elgar started ‘Great is the Lord’ in 1910 it’s an adaptation of Psalm 47 and is fairly popular now but at the time he was composing it, perhaps because there was no patron to commission it in sight, it was doubtful that Elgar would even complete it. It took him two years working in fits…

John Blow (1649-1708): Let thy hand be strengthened

James II and his Queen Mary of Modena were crowned in Westminster Abbey on 23 April 1685, St George’s Day. Blow’s four-part (SATB) setting of the coronation anthem Let thy hand be strengthened would have been sung by the scholars of Westminster School to greet the arrival of the Queen after the Vivats. It’s sung…

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585)(attrib): Out from the deep

Tallis was one of the composers who composed some of the earliest English anthems. Tallis is generally reckoned to have composed around forty but that’s a more than somewhat misleading figure as quite a few of his English compositions are straightforward contrafacta of Latin compositions. There are also several anthems which are no believed to…

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Forgive me, Lord my sin

Very little is known about this piece, we don’t know when Tallis composed it, or for whom, or for what occasion. But it appears in both editions of James Clifford’s published collections of anthem texts. Clifford’s collection was the “greatest hits” compilation of the time so “Forgive me, Lord my sin” must have been both…