Posts Tagged ‘ Baroque choral music ’

Richard Dering (±1580–1630): Ave Virgo gloriosa

0
August 14, 2015

Like Bull and Peter Philips Dering was an English Catholic musician who chose to live abroad so that he could practice his faith. He went first to Venice and the to Rome and for at least three years (1617-1620) he held a post as organist of the convent of English nuns in Brussels and perhaps it was this post which brought him to the notice of the French and English governments for in 1625 he was appointed organist to Charles I's new bride the French Catholic Henrietta Maria he remained at the English court until his death in 1630.  His music can be divided into two categories English and Italianate – his English music is broadly comparable to that of Gibbons, Weelkes and Ward while his Italianate music such as this gracefully written five-part (SSATB) motet in honour of The Virgin is strongly influenced by contemporary Continental fashions, which in practice means that the musical fashions percolating throughout the Catholic hearlands from Italy. I certainly wouldn't place him in the same league as Bull or Peter Philips but if you take him as he is there's much to enjoy in his music. Certainly his contemporaries, including Oliver Cromwell, greatly admired his music and both Peacham and Mace included him in their lists of musical worthies.

Ave Virgo gloriosa dates from early on in his career he first published it in 1617 in his collection of motets all of which were composed in 'first city of the world' and are heavily influenced by the new Italian Baroque style. It's a fluid and simply written piece without much in the way of contrapuntal elaboration that vividly reflects its text. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

John Blow (1649-1708): Let thy hand be strengthened

0
August 4, 2015
The Coronation Procession of King James II and Queen Mary of Modena.  	"The Kings Herbwoman & her 6 Maids, wh Baskets of Sweet Herbs, strewing the way. / The Deans Beadle of Westmr. / The high Constable of Westminster. / A Fife. / + Drums. / The Drum Major."

The Coronation Procession of King James II and Queen Mary of Modena.
"The Kings Herbwoman & her 6 Maids, wh Baskets of Sweet Herbs, strewing the way. / The Deans Beadle of Westmr. / The high Constable of Westminster. / A Fife. / + Drums. / The Drum Major."

James II and his Queen Mary of Modena were crowned in Westminster Abbey on 23 April 1685, St George’s Day. Blow's four-part (SATB) setting of the coronation anthem Let thy hand be strengthened would have been sung by the scholars of Westminster School to greet the arrival of the Queen after the Vivats. It's sung below by the Western Illinois University Singers conducted by Dr. James Stegall at concert given at Wesley Methodist Church, Macomb, on March 19th 2013 as part of a Restoration Cathedral Music symposium. Enjoy :-)

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Johann Adolf Hasse (1699-1783): Requiem in E-flat major [Dresdner Kammerchor-Dresdner Barockorchester]

0
August 2, 2015

Hasse was very famous, popular, and influential, during his lifetime but his works aren't often performed today. His music is very Italianate as indeed was his private life – he married an Italian prima donna and they moved to Italy during his later years. He wrote a vast amount of music including this delightful Requiem in E-flat major. Delightful? A requiem? Well, yes, I can't think of any other word to describe it. It's a very attractive more than somewhat operatic piece of music and when I say 'operatic' I really mean it, it's so operatic that it includes places where the soloist can improvise cadenzas – which they do with considerable flair in this recording. The Dies Irae reminds me of something from the Mozart Requiem, but then strikes out for pastures new, the Lacrymosa does likewise while the Recordare is a long florid soprano aria. The entire piece is like this true it has a few solemn moments but taken as a whole it's operatic and very cheerful indeed in places it's downright bouncy. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Orlande de Lassus (±1530-1594): Osculetur me

0
July 1, 2015

De Lassus used this motet which takes its text from the Song of Songs as the basis for his Mass of the same name. It's an eight-part setting for double choir (SATB SATB) first published in 1582 in Fasciculi aliquot sacrarum it's characterise by long phrasing offset by contrapuntal writing and contrasting sonority between the passages for the individual choirs and the passages for the combined choirs. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

BBC Documentary – the Genius of the Monteverdi’s Vespers (HD) – YouTube

0
June 14, 2015

One of the superb series of documentaries featuring Simon Russell Beale, with The Sixteen, and Harry Christophers. Enjoy :-)
mfi

BBC Documentary talks about Monteverdi's Vespers and about his relationship with the Duke of Mantua, 4th April 2015.

… … …

Simon Russell Beale travels to Italy to explore the story of the notorious Duke of Mantua and his long-suffering court composer Claudio Monteverdi during the turbulent times of the late Italian Renaissance. Out of the volatile relationship between the duke and the composer came Monteverdi's Vespers of 1610, a major turning point in western music. The Sixteen, led by Harry Christophers, explore some of the radical and beautiful choral music in this dramatic composition.

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Archives

Special Pages

My most recent video

Service Unavailable.