Alessandro Scarlatti (1660–1725): Cantata pastorale per la natività di Nostre Signore (Christmas Cantata)

A Scarlatti – Christmas Cantata – Cantata pastorale per la natività di Nostre Signore: Oh di Betlemme altera povertà Gertraut Stoklassa, soprano Purcell Singers / Mainz Chamber Orchestra / Gunter Kerr 1.Sinfonia 2.Recitativo: O di Betlemme 3.Aria: Dal bel seno d’una stella 4.Recitativo: Presa d’uomo la forma 5.Aria: L’Autor d’ogni mio bene 6.Recitativo: Fortunati pastori…

Dieterich Buxtehude (±1637-1707): Herren, vår Gud

This is one of the only two Swedish texted works by Buxtehude to have survived (I wrote about the other one at the start of September, see Dieterich Buxtehude (±1637-1707): Att du Jesu vill mig höra | Saturday Chorale – mfi). The text of Herren, vår Gud (The Lord Our God) is a poetic paraphrasis…

Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1710-1736): — Septem verba a Christo in Cruce — Akademie Für Alte Musik Berlin, René Jacobs

Is this really by Pergolesi? Musicologists have argued the question for for more than a century. There’s no conclusive evidence that it’s by him, yes there are monastic manuscripts dating from nearly a quarter century after his death attributing the Septem verba a Christo in cruce moriente prolata  (The Seven Words of the Dying Christ…

Franz Tunder (1614-1667): An Wasserflüssen Babylon

Tunder’s setting of  An Wasserflüssen Babylon (By the waters of Babylon) is one of only seventeen vocal works of his that survived.  It’s a straightforward setting that uses the chorale melody in the vocal part and surrounds it with a delicate web of instrumental counterpoint that expresses the sense of loss and exile. It’s a…

Mendelssohn: Symphony Nº 2, ‘Lobgesang’ – Live Concert HD

Mendelssohn composed this symphony-cantata for orchestra and chorus in response to a commission from the organisers of the 1840 celebrations commemorating the 400th anniversary of Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press. Its title “Lobgesang” which you can translate variously as “Hymn of Praise” or “Song of Praise” reflects its hybrid structure of three movements scored…

Franz Tunder (1614-1667): Salve mi Jesu

Tunder tends to get just a footnote in the musical histories as Buxtehude’s father in law, predecessor, and founder of the tradition of Abendmusik concerts that Buxtehude brought to full fruition.  His contemporaries thought very well him and he was well-travelled having studied under such masters as Borchgrevinck in Copenhagen and Frescobaldi in Florence before…

Dieterich Buxtehude (±1637-1707): Cantate Domino

Dieterich Buxtehude’s setting of the first four verses from Psalm 95 in the Vulgate (Psalm 96 in protestant bilbles) is a motet scored for SSB or SAB with accompaniment – Viola Da Gamba and organ. It’s a lovely piece that has strong Italianate influences. Close your eyes and you could easily imagine it to be…