Waldemar Ahlen: Sommarpsalm – Koritsia Lund.

Waldemar  Åhlén’s ‘Sommarpsalm’ sung here by the Swedish Choir ‘Koritsia’  directed by Karin Fagius. This performance dates from the 10th International Chamber Choir Competition held at Marktoberdorf in 2007 and was given in the Dreifaltigkeitskirche Kaufbeuren. Enjoy :-). markfromireland Source: Koritsia, Lund, Sweden; Dir.: Karin Fagius – YouTube  Uploaded by DolfRabus on Jul 8, 2008

Sunday Playlist: Fauré Requiem – Escolania Escorial

This week’s playlist is a live performance of Fauré’s requiem recorded at the «Monasterio del Escorial» (Escorial Monastery) on April 11th 2006 (they were so pleased with this performance that they went on to record it again and published it on CD) the soloist was Fran Braojos and the conductor and organist was Javier M.…

Stephen Paulus: Hymn to the Eternal Flame

The American composer Stephen Paulus was born in 1949 and studied composition at the University of Minnesota with Paul Fetler and Dominick Argento, his music is often influenced by romanticism in 2005 he worked together with Michael Dennis Browne to created the oratorio ‘To be Certain of the Dawn’ commemorating the sixtieth anniversary of the…

Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643): Domine ne in furore tuo

Monteverdi’s motet ‘Domine ne in furore tuo‘ or ‘Domine, ne in furore tuo arguas me‘ to give it its full title was one of four that were published in 1620 in the Libro primo de motetti of Giulio Cesare Bianchi. (Bianchi was a cornett player and former pupil of Monteverdi’s). The text is from Psalm…

Rihards Dubra (1964: ) Stetit Angelus

The Latvian composer Rihards Dubra (born 28 February 1964 in Riga) has written several religious works amongst this piece ‘Stetit Angelus’ which was commissioned by the Indonesian choir Vox Angelorum and their director Henry Sutjipto for a choral competition in 2005. Dubra is known to have been particularly pleased to have had the opportunity to…

Henry Purcell (1659-1695): Behold now, praise the Lord

The anthem I’ve picked for this week’s posting is "Behold now, praise the Lord" ( Z3 ) is one of Purcell’s earliest compositions. There’s some debate about exactly when he composed it, with some writers dating it to as early as 1678. I’m not sure how relevant this particular debate is it’s such an extraordinary…

William Mundy (c1529-1591): Sive vigilem

William Mundy (father of John Mundy) seems to have lived and worked only in London. His career spanned the Reformation under Henry VII and Edward VI, Queen Mary’s doomed and bloody attempt at undoing the Reformation, and Queen Elizabeth I’s re-establishment of the English Church with herself as its head. His motet "Sive vigilem" is…

Edmund Hooper (c1553-1621): Behold it is Christ

The English organist and composer Edmund Hooper was born in North Halberton, Devon,  some time around 1553 and died in London on July 14th 1621. Although there is no documentary evidence for it it seems likely that started his musical career as a choir boy at Exeter Cathedral. Whether he sang at Exeter or not…

Henry Purcell (1659-1695): My beloved spake

The anthem featured in this week’s posting is ‘My beloved spake’ which takes its text from the Song of Solomon (Song of Solomon 2: 10-13, 16). It’s known to have been composed before 1678 which makes it one of Purcell’s earliest compositions. Every time I listen to this piece two things strike me: Purcell wrote…