Posts Tagged ‘ Christ Church Cathedral Choir – Oxford ’

Cristóbal de Morales (±1500-1553) O Sacrum Convivium – YouTube

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November 27, 2012

Cristóbal de Morales' "O Sacrum Convivium" is a 5 part Communion motet that probably dates from his time in Rome. Its gentle and understated style was greatly admired by Palestrina who used it as the model for his setting of the Mass "Missa O sacrum convivium".

mfi

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Music of The Pater Noster: Our Father — John Sheppard (±1515-1558)

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October 29, 2012

John Sheppard's setting of the Lord's Prayer is far more elaborate than that of Robert Stone about which I wrote last week. It includes the doxology ('For thine is the kingdom …') found in some versions of the Greek original (Matthew 6:13 καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν, ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ πονηροῦ. ὅτι σοῦ ἐστιν ἡ βασιλεία καὶ ἡ δύναμις καὶ ἡ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας· ἀμήν) which was generally adopted in Protestant English translations of the bible. We don't know which translation Sheppard based and adapted his text from but his setting of it is one of the earliest examples of the progressive lightening of the texture by Sheppard and his fellows in the Chapel Royal. To an extent this was forced on them by the difficulties of achieving the clear diction demanded by the church authorities who wanted syllabic enunciation of the (new) vernacular texts. Sheppard's solution which he followed both in the Lord's prayer and in his Second Service was to write for a five-part ensemble treble, two altos, tenor, and bass, this arrangement was seized upon with relief by his fellow composers and became the standard for just under a century (1558 – 1646). Like Stone and Farmer Sheppard was breaking new musical ground, in the years that followed a lot of music was composed in the style of Sheppard's setting of the Lord's Prayer, but Sheppard's was the first. You can hear it below sung by the Choir of Christ Church Cathedral Oxford, conducted by Stephen Darlington. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Music of The Pater Noster: Pater Noster – Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1525/6-1594)

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October 1, 2012
This entry is part 7 of 22 in the series Music Of The Pater Noster

Palestrina's five-part setting of the Pater Noster has a beauty and serenity that I find quite irresistible. It's a very restrained and balanced piece of music in which Palestrina's attention to structure and detail are very evident. It's in the same tradition as Josquin's and Gombert's motets although in Palestrina's setting there's no canon and he restates the plainchant melody rather more thoroughly. I had some difficulty making up my mind whether to upload the superb recording sung by The Choir of The Abbey School, Tewkesbury or  to embed the YouTube video of  The Choir of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford's, performance of the piece. Eventually I threw a coin in the air and the Christ Church performance won out. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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John Taverner (c1490-1545): Dum transisset Sabbatum I

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April 12, 2012

Annibale Carracci (b1560 d1609) Holy Women at Christ's Tomb Date  c1590 Oil on Canvas

Dum transisset Sabbatum (When the Sabbath was past) was one of Taverner's most greatly admired pieces of music during his lifetime and subsequently. There are several reasons for this, one of them being that it was one of the first pieces of music to adopt what was at the time a startling format of setting to polyphony that which heretofore had been chanted. Another is the close relationship of the text to music and the soaring musical phrases that seem to flow through the piece. It's one of my favourite Taverner compositions. It's performed here by the Choir of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, under Stephen Darlington. You'll find it, the text, and a translation to English below the fold. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Saturday Chorale: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757): Salve Regina

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February 11, 2012

Scarlatti's 'Stabat Mater'  and 'Salve Regina' are among the few of his religious music compositions that are remembered today. The 'Salve Regina'  in particular is a lovely piece of music that deserves to be far better known than it is. I love the gentleness of 'Ad te clamamus' and find the valedictory tone of 'o pia, o dulcis virgo Maria' very moving. This recording is by Christ Church Cathedral Choir, Oxford, conducted by Francis Grier. The soloists were Charles Harris (treble) and Nicholas Clapton (countertenor), Timothy Byram-Wigfield was the organist. Lyrics are below the fold. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Salve Regina Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757) – YouTube Uploaded by markfromireland on Jan 22, 2012

Lyrics: Salve Regina

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