Posts Tagged ‘ English Choirs ’

William Child (1606-1697): O praise the Lord

0
July 15, 2014

William Child is largely forgotten today and when musicologists do discuss his music they tend to dismiss it as unimaginative and utilitarian. I very much doubt though that that is what his contemporaries and his successors, who included Blow and Purcell thought. We may today be grateful for our rich inheritance of music from Blow, Purcell, but it was Child who laid the groundwork for them by singledhandedly producing a vast output of church music for the Anglican church as it struggled to make a new start and re-establish its traditions after the 1660 restoration of the monarchy. His music served as a model for the first generation of Restoration composers and both Blow and Purcell thought sufficiently highly of his music to transcribe it and develop it further  for example by developing the aria-recitative structure which much of his music anticipates. His importance then is as a model but not only as a model, granted he wasn't a genius but even the most run-of-the-mill of his compositions are eminently listenable to and at his best his music shows both vitality and sensitivity to the the texts he was setting. I think it unfair to dismiss his music as nothing more than a way-point between Gibbons and Blow it's more accurate to see him as the first Restoration composer as the man who paved the way for Blow and Purcell. His anthem 'O Praise the Lord', a setting of the first four verses of Psalm 135, was 'Composed Upon the Restauration of the Church And Royall Family in 1660' and marks the start of the climb to greatness of English church music as it recovered from the devastation wrought upon it by the Puritans.  Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Déodat De Séverac (1872 – 1921): Tantum Ergo

0
July 8, 2014

De Séverac was a native of Languedoc and its music profoundly influenced him. He entered the Paris Conservatoire as a student in 1896 but transferred to the Schola Cantorum as he disliked the rigid academicism of the Conservatoire. He studied under d’Indy, Magnard and Guilmant and learnt the piano from Albéniz. I like his music and wish it would be perormed more often his four-part setting of Tantum Ergo is a beautiful motet consisting of just two verses and an Amen code. If you haven' t heard his choral music before this is its perfect introduction. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Philip Stopford (b.1977): Do not be afraid – Choir of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

2
May 23, 2014

David Poulter and the Choir of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral perform Philip Stopford's anthem Do Not Be Afraid in Liverpool Cathedral.

Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Frederick Arthur Gore Ouseley (1825–1889): O Saviour Of The World – Choir of King’s College Cambridge, Easter 2014

0
May 3, 2014

Sir Frederick Arthur Gore Ouseley's  (1825–1889) music is largely unknown today. Ousely was born into the upper echelons of Victorian Britain's ruling class, his father was Ambassador to Russia, the Dukes of York and Wellington were his godfathers, he was a musically precocious child who composed his first opera at the tender age of eight. Although his music is now neglected he was very influential in his day both because of his musical style and because he was Warden of St Michael’s College Tenbury and  Professor of Music at Oxford University much of Stainer's music, for example, is clearly influenced by Ousely. O Saviour of the World is a short, unpretentious, but very pleasing piece sung below by the Choir of King's College, Cambridge at their Service for Easter 2014. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

George Malcolm (1917-1997): Miserere mei Deus

2
April 16, 2014

Psalm 51 – the Miserere, is the Biblical text around which the Ash Wednesday liturgy revolves. George Malcolm's setting (Malcolm was Master of Music at Westminster Cathedral between 1947 and 1959) is an alternatim setting of the Psalm. It's a beautiful piece of work that deserves to be far better known in which Malcolm switches between the higher and lower voices in an unadorned second mode chant which he offsets with polyphonic expansions and variations. The voices join together for the second half of the Gloria  in a descant of great power and beauty.

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Archives

Special Pages