Posts Tagged ‘ English Choirs ’

Francois Poulenc (1899-1963): Salve Regina

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May 27, 2015

Poulenc's setting of the Salve was written in May 1941. It's a simple homophonic setting of the antiphon, simple but rather beautiful. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Exsultate Deo

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May 16, 2015

This is one of my favourites amongst Palestrina's motets. It's a five-part setting (SAATB) of the first three verses of Psalm 81. It's  a bright celebratory piece of music full of word-painting to depict the musical instruments mentioned in the text. Whenever people try to tell me that Palestrina's music is dull, cold, and lifeless, this is one of the pieces of music I use to refute them. Enjoy :-).

mfi

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Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856): The Angels’ Goodnight

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May 9, 2015

Schumann's four-part setting of Friedrich Rückert's poem was first published in 1846. It's known and loved in the anglophone world in translation as The Angels' Goodnight sung here by the Tewkesbury Abbey School Choir directed by Benjamin Nicholas. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Stella quam viderant Magi – Choir of Trinity College Cambridge

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May 6, 2015

The Epiphany text Stella quam viderant Magi  was frequently set by Sixteenth century composers at least twenty of whom including Josquin Desprez and Palestrina set it. Palestrina's setting is sung here by the Choir of Trinity College Cambridge directed by Stephen Darlington during Choral Evensong from Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, 14th January 2015. I've put the text and translation below the video. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Miserere nostri

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March 30, 2015

Miserere nostri is unusual amongst Tallis' motets in being set for more than five parts and in following a continental double canon model rather than an English model. It's for six voices with a seventh (tenor) voice making an appearance once for harmonic reasons.

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

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