John Sheppard (±1515-1558): Haste Thee O God (attr.)

Compared to that other Tudor-era composers Sheppard’s music is still relatively little known and infrequently performed which is perhaps why this recording of Haste the, O God, a setting of Psalm 70 generally attributed to Sheppard is the first ever recording of it. It’s also been attributed to Tye but it sounds more like Sheppard…

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585)(attrib): Out from the deep

Tallis was one of the composers who composed some of the earliest English anthems. Tallis is generally reckoned to have composed around forty but that’s a more than somewhat misleading figure as quite a few of his English compositions are straightforward contrafacta of Latin compositions. There are also several anthems which are no believed to…

William Byrd (±1539-1623): Constitues eos principes

Constitues eos principes (You will make them princes) is one of three pieces of music that Byrd composed specifically for the feast of saints Peter and Paul, he published it in the 1607 Gradualia. It’s a six-part setting, confident and modern and full of energy in which the anguish we associate with the Cantiones is…

Thomas Weelkes (1576-1623): Give ear, O Lord

The text of Weelkes’ anthem ‘Give ear, O Lord’ is from William Hunnis’ (d1597) collection of devotional texts ‘An humble sute of a repentant sinner for mercie’ it’s a penitential text and there are some indications that Weelkes and Hunnis, who was master of the Chapel Royal choristers at the time he wrote it, knew…

Robert Ramsey (fl c1612-1644): In monte Oliveti

Ramsey’s madrigal-anthem probably dates from around 1615 and was written for private devotions rather than the liturgy. It’s a six-part setting that with its harmonic tensions, repetitions, and use of declamation and and dissonance can sound surprisingly modern to our ears. Enjoy :-). mfi

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Forgive me, Lord my sin

Very little is known about this piece, we don’t know when Tallis composed it, or for whom, or for what occasion. But it appears in both editions of James Clifford’s published collections of anthem texts. Clifford’s collection was the “greatest hits” compilation of the time so “Forgive me, Lord my sin” must have been both…

Edward Bairstow (1874–1946): Save us, O Lord

Bairstow started out as a teacher but in 1893 he took up a post combining the duties of pupil and amanuensis to Frederick Bridge at Westminster Abbey. From there he progressed through various posts as organist and choirmaster until eventually taking up the post of organist in of York Minster in 1913 a post he…

Robert Ramsey (fl c1612-1644): When David heard

Ramsey was probably born at some time during the 1590s but the first reliable record we have of him is at Cambridge from 1612. He seems to have spent his entire adult life at Cambridge taking a B.Mus in 1616 and being appointed or­gan­ist at or­gan­ist of Tri­n­ity Col­lege, Cambrid­ge from 1628 until his death…

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Jesu salvator saeculi

Tallis’ setting of the compline hymn Jesu salvator saeculi (Jesus, saviour of the age) is an alternim setting that alternates the chant and composed music retaining the cantus firmus in the top part. Under Sarum usage it would have been sung between low Sunday and Ascension it’s typical of the new style of hymnody pioneered…

John Taverner (±1490–1545): Christe Jesu, pastor bone

While the carols sung in Elizabethan England were often distinctly secular and in English, the music sung in the Cathedrals, at court, and in University Chapels was, despite the reformation, still permitted to be sung in Latin, of course making it crystal clear where your loyalties lay was also a very good idea. Taverner’s Christe…