Posts Tagged ‘ English choral music ’

Edward Elgar(1857-1934): They are at rest

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September 12, 2013

Frogmore Mausoleum 150x150 Elgar wrote his choral elegy 'They are at rest' was response to a commission from Sir Walter Parratt for an anthem to be sung on the anniversary of Queen Victoria's death. The text is by Cardinal John Henry Newman (1801-1890) and it was first performed at the Royal Mausoleum at Frogmore on January 22nd 1910. It's sung below the Westminster Abbey Choir conducted by James O'Donnell. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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William Byrd (±1539-1623): Christus resurgens

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September 9, 2013

byrd_signature_01_small Byrd published his atmospheric 'Christus resurgens' in the 1605 Gradualia. It's form where the slow sung cantus firmus is taken by one of the voice parts  – the tenor in this case is old-fashioned and fell from favour in England  as a result of the abandonment of plainsong by the Anglican authorities.  It's a very defiant piece of music in which Byrd exerts his considerable skill to depict musically the Resurrection as both a struggle and a victory. It's sung below by the Cambridge Singers conducted by John Rutter. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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C. V. Stanford (1852 – 1924): Service in B flat, Op 10 – Nunc dimittis, ‘Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace’

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September 5, 2013

Standford Sketch 150x200

Stanford's gentle and meditative setting of the Nunc dimittis for his Service in B flat, Op 10 is notable for its scoring for tenor and bass voices only until the gloria. You'll find it below sung by the Westminster Abbey Choir conducted by James O'Donnell. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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C. V. Stanford (1852 – 1924): Service in B flat, Op 10 – Magnificat, ‘My soul doth magnify the Lord’

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September 4, 2013

Standford Sketch 150x200 Stanford composed his Service in B flat, Op 10, in 1879 during his time as Organist at Trinity College, Cambridge, it's a pioneering piece of music in which Stanford did something quite new to English choral music at the time which was to apply Brahmsian symphonic technique to sacred choral music thereby giving it a cohesiveness and interest that make it stand out from  the run-of-the-mill choral music which was the staple of contemporaneous English church music. It's sung below by the Westminster Abbey Choir, conducted by James O'Donnell. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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John Rutter (b. 1945): A crown of glory

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August 30, 2013

John Rutter 150x204 Rutter's choral music has its roots firmly in the English choral tradition, of Holst, Vaughan Williams, Howells, Britten and Tippett, 'spiced with the harmonic and melodic language of Fauré and Duruflé'. He composed A crown of glory in response to a commission by the Worshipful Company of Feltmakers of London for the 62nd Annual United Service of the Guilds of the City of London held at St Paul’s Cathedral on 26 March 2004. It's a vigorous and spacious piece of music sung below by the Choir of St. Paul's Cathedral, London, conducted by John Scott. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Forthcoming Posts

  • Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625): ‘Drop, drop, slow tears’
  • 6th Sunday of Lent 2014: Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) The Seven Last Words of our Saviour on the Cross Op 51

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