Posts Tagged ‘ English choral music ’

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): If ye love me

0
October 3, 2013

Edward VI 150x190 Although his sympathies were firmly Catholic Tallis wrote anthems for the reformed rites prescribed by Edward VI's  First Prayer Book of 1549. Edward who Like all the Tudors was fond of music was an ardent Protestant. His government required church music to support the Anglican church's exhortations to Godly living and to enchance the greater emphasis on scripture, preaching, and teaching. Out went intricately layered polyphony music in Latin and in came simpler and more readily comprehensible structures such as this beautiful four-part miniature in two sections. The stunningly clear and beautiful performance of it that you'll find below is sung by The Cardinall's Musick conducted by Andrew Carwood. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Edward Elgar(1857-1934): They are at rest

0
September 12, 2013

Frogmore Mausoleum 150x150 Elgar wrote his choral elegy 'They are at rest' was response to a commission from Sir Walter Parratt for an anthem to be sung on the anniversary of Queen Victoria's death. The text is by Cardinal John Henry Newman (1801-1890) and it was first performed at the Royal Mausoleum at Frogmore on January 22nd 1910. It's sung below the Westminster Abbey Choir conducted by James O'Donnell. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

William Byrd (±1539-1623): Christus resurgens

0
September 9, 2013

byrd_signature_01_small Byrd published his atmospheric 'Christus resurgens' in the 1605 Gradualia. It's form where the slow sung cantus firmus is taken by one of the voice parts  – the tenor in this case is old-fashioned and fell from favour in England  as a result of the abandonment of plainsong by the Anglican authorities.  It's a very defiant piece of music in which Byrd exerts his considerable skill to depict musically the Resurrection as both a struggle and a victory. It's sung below by the Cambridge Singers conducted by John Rutter. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

C. V. Stanford (1852 – 1924): Service in B flat, Op 10 – Nunc dimittis, ‘Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace’

0
September 5, 2013

Standford Sketch 150x200

Stanford's gentle and meditative setting of the Nunc dimittis for his Service in B flat, Op 10 is notable for its scoring for tenor and bass voices only until the gloria. You'll find it below sung by the Westminster Abbey Choir conducted by James O'Donnell. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

C. V. Stanford (1852 – 1924): Service in B flat, Op 10 – Magnificat, ‘My soul doth magnify the Lord’

0
September 4, 2013

Standford Sketch 150x200 Stanford composed his Service in B flat, Op 10, in 1879 during his time as Organist at Trinity College, Cambridge, it's a pioneering piece of music in which Stanford did something quite new to English choral music at the time which was to apply Brahmsian symphonic technique to sacred choral music thereby giving it a cohesiveness and interest that make it stand out from  the run-of-the-mill choral music which was the staple of contemporaneous English church music. It's sung below by the Westminster Abbey Choir, conducted by James O'Donnell. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Archives

Special Pages