Posts Tagged ‘ Epiphany ’

Jacob Handl (1550–1591): Omnes de Saba venient

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January 7, 2014

Jacob Handl 150x175Handl's 'Omnes de Saba venient' is a wonderfully cheerful Epiphany motet that get's downrght playful at times.  I especially like the rising and falling figure in the 'Alleluia' and the rythmic movement at 'de Saba venient' Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

William Byrd (±1539-1623) — Vidimus stellam ejus in Oriente a4

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January 4, 2014

Vidimus stellam ejus in Oriente, et venimus cum muneribus adorare Dominum.
(Matthew 2:2)

For we have seen his star in the East, and are come to adore him.

The Cardinall's Musick, conducted by Andrew Carwood singing Byrd's Communion motet for Mass on the Feast of the Epiphany. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Epiphany Carol: We Three Kings Of Orient Are — Choir of Kings College, Cambridge

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January 3, 2014

A carol for Epiphany, The choir of Kings College, Cambridge sing We Three Kings Of Orient Are during Carols From Kings 2009.

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Epiphany Hymn: The growing limbs of God the Son

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January 6, 2013

Christopher Dearnley (1930–2000) was the organist at St. Paul's Cathedral, London, between 1968 and 1990. A talented composer in his own write he set 'The growing limbs of God the Son' to the tune known as 'St. Chad'. It's a warm and affectionate piece of music, with a wonderfully fluid melodic line.  It's sung below by the Choir of St. Paul's Cathedral, London, conducted by John Scott. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Saturday Chorale: Byrd – Senex puerum portabat

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January 7, 2012

Byrd's four-part anthem Senex puerum portabat was published in 1607 in the second book of Gradualia. It's a beautifully expressive piece of music in which Byrd manipulates the vocal lines to convey the joy felt both by Simeon and by the Virgin Mary. Thus at the end of the first line – "Senex puerum portabat",  he sets the word 'portabat' to a rising interval holding the melodic line high. Similarly in the last line culminating in the word 'adoravit' where Byrd uses the vocal lines to portray both the Virgin's adoration of the Messiah and her joy as the mother of a new-born child. It's performed here by the St Paul's Cathedral Choir conducted by John Scott. The lyrics and a translation are below the fold. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

 

Video Source: Byrd - Senex puerum portabat – YouTube Uploaded by markfromireland on Jan 4, 2012

Lyrics: Senex puerum portabat

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

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