Felice Anerio (±1560-1614): Regina caeli laetare (a8)

Anerio’s eight part setting of this Marian Antiphons is a perfect example why his contemporaries considered him to be a worthy successor to Palestrina as official Papal composer. It combines beautiful flowing polyphony combined with homophonic passages and shifts in timing. As you might expect from Palestrina’s successor the textual clarity is impeccable throughout. Enjoy…

Felice Anerio (±1560-1614): Magnificat quinti toni

Felice Anerio (the elder of the two brothers) had a very successful musical career starting as  a choirboy at Santa Maria Maggiore and at St Peter’s where he studied under Palestrina. He went on to be maestro di capella  at the Spanish Santa Maria di Monserrato and the English College before being appointed composer to…

Felice Anerio (±1560-1614): Stabat Mater A12

From about 1610 a spirit of triumphalism could be heard in much of the music heard in the Sistine Chapel. There was a trend towards the use of massive vocal forces such as the Masse and Motets scored double and triple choirs (including basso continuo) composed by Vincenzo Ugolini, (1580 – 1638), maestro di capella…

Felice Anerio (±1560-1614): Christe redemptor omnium

Felice Anerio’s alternatim beautiful four-voice setting of the sixth century Advent Vesper hymn Christe redemptor omnium (Christ, Redeemer of Us All) is very traditional in style. Its imitative polyphony is very close to the chant and other than at the word ‘caelum‘ avoids word-painting. It’s sung below by the choir of Westminster Cathedral conducted by…

Felice Anerio (±1560-1614): Salve Regina

Felice Anerio (±1560-1614) is the older but lesser-known of the Anerio brothers. He had a very successful musical career starting his career as a choirboy in S. Maria Maggiore before transferring to St Peter’s to sing and study under Palestrina. Following his release from St. Peter’s he held a variety of prestigious posts in Rome…