Hans Leo Hassler (1562-1612): Ad Dominum

Hassler was very influential in his day both Bach (O Haput voll Blut und Wunde) and Schütz (Psalmen Davids) quoted his music. The son of a stonecutter and part time musician in Nuremburg he was sent to Venice to study music and composition. In Venice he came under the influence of the Gabrieli’s  studying under…

Franz Tunder (1614-1667): Ach Herr, laß deine lieben Engelein

Bach used the text to Tunder’s cantata Ach Herr, laß deine lieben Engelein (O lord, let Thy dear angels) in the closing chorale of Bach’s St. John Passion, it’s from Schalling’s hymn Herzlich lieb hab ich dich, o Herr (Great is my love for Thee, o Lord) but there’s absolutely no resemblance between the two…

Franz Tunder (1614-1667): An Wasserflüssen Babylon

Tunder’s setting of  An Wasserflüssen Babylon (By the waters of Babylon) is one of only seventeen vocal works of his that survived.  It’s a straightforward setting that uses the chorale melody in the vocal part and surrounds it with a delicate web of instrumental counterpoint that expresses the sense of loss and exile. It’s a…

Franz Tunder (1614-1667): Salve mi Jesu

Tunder tends to get just a footnote in the musical histories as Buxtehude’s father in law, predecessor, and founder of the tradition of Abendmusik concerts that Buxtehude brought to full fruition.  His contemporaries thought very well him and he was well-travelled having studied under such masters as Borchgrevinck in Copenhagen and Frescobaldi in Florence before…