Posts Tagged ‘ Harry Christophers ’

Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla (±1590 – 1664): Deus in adiutorium

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April 2, 2014

Deus in adiutorium is an introductory versicles intended to be sung during various Offices. It's a cry to God for help from the faithful and De Padilla's setting, a simple plainsong intonation, is very typical of the use to which plainsong was put in Spain and its colonies at the time.

markfromireland

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1st Sunday of Lent 2014: Duarte Lôbo (±1564–1646) — ¨Pater Peccavi & Missa Pro Defunctis a8

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March 9, 2014

Duarte Lôbo the most famous Portuguese composer of his time was born sometime between 1564 and 1569 probably in Alcáçovas. He became a choirboy at Évora Cathedral and studied music under the celebrated Manuel Mendes at the Cathedral cloister school the Évora Claustra da Sé, his career was stellar –  maestro de capilla at Lisbon's Hospital Real, and from about 1591 until at least 1639 he held the post of maestro de capilla at Lisbon Cathedral. He directed the Seminário de S Bartolomeu, in Lisbon, and for many years he taught music at the Lisbon Claustra da Sé where his pupils included António Fernandes, João Alvares Frouvo, Fernando de Almeida and Manuel Machado. His polyphony combines learned counterpoint with expressiveness and attention to the meaning of the text – you can can hear the influence of composers such as Ockeghem and Josquin in his use of cantus firmus and canonical techniques some of his Masses are parody Masses based on motets by Palestrina and Francisco Guerrero.

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Juan Gutiérrez de Padilla (± 1590 -1664): Pater Peccavi

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February 28, 2014

Padilla chose to dramatise Pater Peccavi his setting of the parable of the Prodigal Son by using duets – the son's words are soprano to bass and the father's to tenor and bass.  These duets are commented upon by the choir. It's a strange though very lovely piece of music that I listen to a few times a year with great enjoyment, as I hope will you.

markfromireland

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Felice Anerio (±1560-1614): Stabat Mater A12

February 21, 2014

From about 1610 a spirit of triumphalism could be heard in much of the music heard in the Sistine Chapel. There was a trend towards the use of massive vocal forces such as the Masse and Motets scored double and triple choirs (including basso continuo) composed by Vincenzo Ugolini, (1580 - 1638), maestro di capella at St Peter´'s from 1620 on. Felice Anerio's twelve-part setting of the Stabat Mater should be seen in this context of Counter-reformation triumphalism. To my mind it's certainly the equal of the better known eight-part settings by de Lassus and Palestrina. One of the things that makes Anerio's setting of the Stabat Mater is his ingenious manipulation of the harmonic rhythms of the piece to suggest triple time when it is fact in duple time.*

This ingenuity coupled with his masterly use of harmony, rhythm, and his controlled use of textural changes ensure that musical interest and momentum are maintained throughout the piece.
Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

* There is one place in the motet where Anerio uses true triple time at the words 'Inflammatus et accensus... in die iudicia' (towards the end) -- mfi.

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Heinrich Suso (ca. 1295-1366): In Dulci Jubilo

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December 18, 2013

Heinrich Suso Henrich Suso (or Seuse) was a German Dominican monk and mystic and follower of Eckhart whose writings both in German and Latin translation were widely read throughout Germany during the second half of the fourteenth and in the fifteenth century. Nowadays he's mostly remembered for his macaronic carol 'In Dulci Jubilo' the story goes that Suso who was famous for his visions had a vision ome night in 1328  in which he joined angels as they danced and sang. The words the angels sang were macaronic – a mixture of German and Latin and Suso wrote down the lyrics of their song which a kindly angel dictated to him. Its date makes 'In Dulci Jubilo'  or 'Nun singet und seid froh!'  the oldest known macaronic carol and the melody to which it is sung is known to date from the early 14th Century. It's inspired many carols in different languages including John Mason Neale's, 'Good Christian Men, Rejoice'.  Neale's carol was however by no means the first version of it in English that honour goes to John Wedderburn's Gude and Godlie Ballatis ("In dulci jubilo, Now let us sing with mirth and jo[y]") which dates from 1540. It's sung below by The Sixteen conducted by Harry Christophers. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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