Posts Tagged ‘ Motets ’

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Dilectus meus descendit

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September 24, 2014

Dilectus meus descendit (My beloved has gone down) is the twenty-first in the series of Palestrina's chamber motets which draw upon the sensual language and imagery of  The Song of Songs. Enjoy :-)

mfi

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Sebastián de Vivanco (1551-1622): O Rex gloriae

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September 19, 2014

This setting of O Rex gloriae by Vivanco would have been sung as the Antiphon to the Magnificat for Second Vespers at Ascension. It's a double-choir motet and was published in  1610 in Salamanca as part of a collection of his motets. Enjoy :-)

mfi

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Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Caput eius aurum optimum

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September 17, 2014

Caput eius aurum optimum (His head is as the finest gold) is the twentieth in the series of motets written to be sung in devotional gatherings of the kind popular in Italy as a result of the religious revival spearheaded by St. Phlip Neri in Rome in the 1560s and 1570s.  Enjoy :-).

mfi

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William Byrd (±1539-1623): Plorans Plorabit

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September 12, 2014

William Byrd captioned 150x220pxByrd's five part (SAATB) setting of verses seventeen and eighteen from Jeremiah 13 was published in the 1605 Gradualia. It's a bit unusual in that unlike most of the content of the 1605 gradualia  it's not a liturgical motet. Further more its text was manifestly chosen as a reference to  the situation of the English Catholic community and their persecution at the hands of an increasingly hostile protestant state. In fact in choosing these particular verses Byrd was going quite a bit further than he'd gone before in warning the monarch and his queen (James I and Anne of Denmark) that their continuing to hold the Lord's flock captive would lead to divine retribution unless they humbled themselves :

Plorans plorabit, et deducet oculus meus lacrimas, quia captus est grex Domini. Dic regi et
dominatrici: Humiliamini, sedete, quoniam descendit de capite vestro corona gloriae vestrae.

Mine eye shall weep sore, and run down with tears, because the Lord’s flock is carried away
captive. Say unto the king and to the queen, Humble yourselves, sit down: for your
principalities shall come down, even the crown of your glory.

Jeremiah 13, vv. 17–18

The sense of grief throughout this lament for the condition of his fellow Catholics is palpable it's a flood of grief and anger that sweeps all before it. Enjoy :-).

mfi

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Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Adiuro vos, filiae Hierusalem

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September 10, 2014

This is the nineteenth in the series of twenty-nine motets based upon The Song of Songs intended to be sung on non-liturgical devotional occasions. Enjoy :-)

mfi

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