Posts Tagged ‘ Motets ’

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Wipe away my sins, O Lord

0
October 31, 2014

When the First Book of Common Prayer was introduced on Whitsunday, 9 June 1549 the need for a repertory of service music in the vernacular became urgent. One way of plugging the gap was to make use of what is known as a contrafactum (plural contrafacta) of which this is one.

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Quae est ista quae progreditur

0
October 29, 2014

Who is she who comes forth
like the rising dawn,
fair as the moon and bright as the sun,
terrible as an army in full array?

The twenty-third in the series of motets based upon the Song of Songs Quae est ista quae progreditur it's typical of  Counter-Reformation Marian fervour in its depiction of the Virgin as Our Lady of Victory. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548 – 1611): Surrexit Pastor Bonus

0
October 25, 2014

Tomás Luis de Victoria's  six-part Paschal motet Surrexit Pastor bonus is a favourite of mine. It's sung below by La Grande Chapelle. Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Robert Carver (fl 1484– 1567): O bone Jesu

0
October 20, 2014

Robert Carver (or Carvor) was an Augustinian monk whose compositions are the source of the Carvor Choir book. He was evidently musically very ambitious, as you can hear from his nineteen part motet  O bone Jesu (SSSAATTTTTTTTTTTBBB). It's a very assured piece of music that illustrates in a quite spectacular manner how the English fondness for full sonorities was shared by their Scots brethren it also presents a technical challenge equalled only by Tallis' Spem in Alium   Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Pulchra es amica mea

0
October 1, 2014

Pulchra es amica mea (Thou art beautiful, O my love) is the twenty-second in the series  of twenty-nine motets based upon Song of Songs published by Palestrina to meet the demand for music to be sung at the meetings of the many religious groups, orders, and sodalities springing upduring the religious revival then taking place in Italy . Enjoy :-).

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

Archives

Special Pages