Posts Tagged ‘ Motets ’

William Byrd (±1539-1623): Domine ante te omne desiderium

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August 29, 2014

This terse but wonderful six-part setting of two verses from Psalm 37 (Psalm 38 in protestant Bibles) is an early piece which exists only in manuscript. I love how the first verse is so … … … tenative and how it gathers pace, and conviction, as Byrd moves the motet forward to describing in music the Psalmist's feelings.
Enjoy :-)

mfi

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Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Dilectus meus mihi

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August 27, 2014

'My beloved is mine' is the seventeenth of Palestrina's motets in the set of twenty-nine that set verses from the Song of Songs. As with all these settings Palestrina's setting is very concise and in some ways quite plain the better to make it easily performable by groups of varying compositions and levels of ability. Enjoy :-).

mfi

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Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Surge, amica mea, speciosa mea

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August 20, 2014

Palestrina's set of motets based upon the song of songs was wildly popular not least because their emotional range was such that depending on how the group singing a particulat motet chose to sing it whether to emphasise the intimate, and sensual side of the motets or as you can hear below to stress their public, sacred and motet-like nature. Enjoy :-)

mfi

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Francesco Cavalli (1602-1676): Magnificat A Sei Voci

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August 19, 2014

Cavalli was born in Crema in February 1602 the son of Giovanni Battista Caletti Bruni, who at that time was maestro di cappella in Crema's Cathedral. He had a particularly beautiful voice, so much so that Federigo Cavalli, the chief magistrate of the city and one of Venice's foremost aristocrats took the then fourteen-year old boy with him to Venice promising that not only would he be fed and paid but that Monteverdi himself would be his music teacher (Cavalli changed his name from Bruni to Cavalli in gratitude). His musical career is best described as one of steady progression rather than a meteoric rise, his fame spread and his compositional technique matured, and Cavalli rose steadily through the ranks of the musical profession until he was so well-thought-of that when Monteverdi died it was Cavalli who was hailed as his successor as the most important musical force in The Serene Republic.

He composed this six-part setting of the Magnificat in 1650 to complete the posthumous edition of the Messa a Quattro voci e Salmi published in memory of his mentor, maestro, and friend Claudio Monteverdi.

It's a very good example of what for lack of a better term I'll call post-Monteverdi Venetian. Its structure is highly sectionalised and it's marked by a wonderfully light 'concertato misto' approach. Indeed 'misto' (mixed) describes it precisely, and Cavalli handling of this variation is deft and masterful, there are  solos, duets, trios, embellishments to the vocal line, and some verse taut and tersely written tutti that provide both punctuation and relief.

Enjoy :-)

mfi

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Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (±1525-1594): Surge, propera, amica mea

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August 13, 2014

While I was researching this posting I came across this performance of Surge, propera, amica mea (Rise up, make haste, my love,) given by the Spanish choir Coro Musicalia at a concert given on May 20th 2012 at the Iglesia de El Salvador, Valladolid. I was impressed and enjoyed it greatly, I hope that you will too.

mfi

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

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