Posts Tagged ‘ Peter Philips ’

Peter Philips (±1560-1628): Surgens Jesus Dominus

2
May 6, 2013

Philips' Easter motet 'Surgens Jesus Dominus' (Christ our Lord rising)  which he published in 1612 inCantiones Sacrae has a wonderful sense of forward movement and of joy. I particularly like how he sets Jesus' words apart from the rest of the moter by using three simple block chords to emphasise them. It's sung below by the Tudor Consort conducted by Peter Walls. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Peter Philips (±1560-1628): Tristitia Vestra

0
April 7, 2013

Phillips composed this gem-like motet in Commune Apostolorum, Tempore Paschali ( for The Common of Apostles in Paschal Time). He wanted to depict the Apostles' grief at Jesus' death turning to joy at Jesus' reappearance following his resurrection. To do it he used a slow-moving sonorous polyphony at the start of the motet to depict their despair but this changes to a joyful triple time at 'Convertetur in gaudium'  (turned to joy) which in turn gives way to a rousing hectic closing Alleluia. It's sung below by the Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge conducted by Richard Marlow. I've included the Latin text and an English translation below the player. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Peter Philips (±1560-1628): Jubilate Deo omnis terra

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April 2, 2013

Philips' motet 'Jubilate Deo omnis terra'  (Rejoice in the Lord in all lands) is a setting of  a slightly adapted Psalm 99 in the Vulgate (Psalm 100 in the KJV and later). It's polychoral –  SATB SATB, and the thirteenth piece in his collection Cantiones sacrae octonis vocibus published in 1613. I enjoy listening to this motet with its clear celebratory tone,  I also admire the skill with which Philips creates musical depictions, for example at 'servite Domino in laetitia' ('serve the Lord with gladness') he switches from duple to triple time to depict the emotion.  It's sung below by the Royal Holloway Choir accompanied by The English Cornett and Sackbut Ensemble, the conductor was  Rupert Gough. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Habemus Papam! – Tu Es Petrus – Peter Philips (±1560-1628)

2
March 14, 2013

On the day that we learn of the election of a new Pope what could be more appropriate than Peter Philips' motet "Tu Es Petrus" ("You are Peter") from his 1613 Cantiones sacrae?

markfromireland

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Peter Philips (±1560-1628): Salve Regina

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January 10, 2013

glorification of the virgin - tot sins - captioned Peter Philips was born in 1560 or 1561, presumably in London. He was trained as a choirboy and in composition at St Paul's Cathedral by the famous Catholic recusant Sebastian Westcote who was almoner and choirmaster there. Westcote died in 1582 leaving a legacy to Philips. Like his contemporary Byrd Philips was a Catholic unlike Byrd he had no powerful aristocratic protectors. Westcote's death thus left Philips bereft of anyone of standing to protect him from the hostile attentions of the protestant authorities. He fled England in 1582 fearing persecution and never returned. His choral music is both cosmopolitan and somewhat conservative in style but within his self-imposed limits Philips is at least the equal in musical skill to his better-remembered contemporaries such as Lassus, Marenzio, and yes, William Byrd. His setting of the Salve Regina starts by quoting the opening phrase of the plainchant but rapidly proceeds to Philips' typically ingenious double-choir writing full of lively contrasts and alternations of tempi.

markfromireland

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  • Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625): ‘Drop, drop, slow tears’
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