Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876): Who can express the noble acts of the Lord? – Paul Phoenix soloist

Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810–1876) was the illegitimate son of Samuel Wesley (1766–1837) and his housekeeper, Sarah Suter, the Sebastian part of his name is in honour of Johann Sebastian Bach whose music his father loved. Despite the stigma of being illegitimate –  which was an almost insurmountable obstacle in late nineteenth century,  Britain he became…

Heinrich Schütz (1585–1672): Jauchzet dem Herren

To my mind Schütz is the most important composer in Germany before the advent of Johann Sebastian Bach. His family wanted him to be a lawyer but fortunately for him (and for us) in 1608 the Landgrave of Moritz gave him money to travel to Venice and study music under Giovanni Gabrieli. At that time…

Giovanni Paolo Cima (1570- 1630): Confitemini Domino

Back in May of last year when I was writing about Cima’s musical style I wrote this: Stylis­tical­ly I’d de­scribe his vocal sac­red music as a mix of moderate re­form­ism and con­ser­vat­ism in which polyp­hony gradual­ly gave way to some solo motets in a style, similar to Viadana’s. Similar, but not ident­ical, be­cause Cima’s music…