Posts Tagged ‘ Religious Music ’

Bach St John Passion Johannes-Passion BWV 245 John Eliot Gardiner – YouTube

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April 21, 2014

J. S. Bach (1685–1750): Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr, zu Dir BWV 246/40a (De profundis)

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April 12, 2014

Of the five passions mentioned by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and Johann Friedrich Agricola in Johann Sebastian Bach’s obituary notice of 1754 only two have survived the one based on the Gospel According to St. John and the one based on the Gospel According to St. Matthew. There was also a passion based on the Gospel According to St. Mark but only the text of that particular passion has come down to us. So what of the other two? They seem to have vanished without trace but an important point to remember is that the passions Bach presented in Leipzig weren't necessarily always composed by him. He also presented the works of other composers such Reinhard Keiser it's entirely possible that the St. Luke Passion that he presented to the congregation in 1730 and then in 1745 was another composer's work. We also know that the St. Luke Passion published in the 1895  edition of Bach's complete works and listed as BWV 246 is very unlikely to have been composed by Bach. In 1971 writing in the Bach-Jahrbuch the late Yoshitake Kobayashi wrote about an autograph copy by Bach in which he had taken the two-voice setting sung by Peter in the St. Luke passion to the words of the sixth verse of the chorale and refashioned the chorale melody to make it conform to the expanded form in use in his parish. This expansion is the basis of the expanded this chorale setting  you can hear below scored for tenor and five strings, including two violas. A curiosity? Certainly, but one that will amply repay the very small amount of time it takes to listen to.

markfromireland

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Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Absterge Domine

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April 7, 2014

Absterge Domine was one of Tallis' greatest hits. It's one of his 'devotional' Elizabethan Latin motets (i.e. its text is non-liturgical,) and despite the fact that it was intended for private use it appears in no less than four contrafacta as well as in the 1575 Cantiones Sacrae. It's deeply penitential with short sections some of which Tallis repeats to heighten the dramatic effect. In fact it's a very dramatic piece of music that rises and falls and uses the minor and major modes to increase the musical – and emotional, impact.

markfromireland

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Felix Mendelssohn (1809–1847): I Waited For The Lord

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March 31, 2014

Mendelssohn's 'I Waited For The Lord' performed by the Maîtrise de l'Académie Vocale de Paris, soloists Morgane Collomb & Laura Jarrell – sopranos, conductor Julien Godawatta, Iain SImcock, organist. The performance was given on June 11th 2011 at l'Église Saint Merry.

markfromireland

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Knabenchor der Chorakademie singt Abendlied von Rheinberger – YouTube

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March 4, 2014

Knabenchor der Chorakademie Dortmund sing Rheinberger's Abendlied

"Bleib bei uns, denn es will Abend werden, und der Tag hat sich geneiget, o bleib bei uns, denn es will Abend werden." Lukas 24:29

( 29 But they constrained him, saying: Stay with us, because it is towards evening and the day is now far spent. And he went in with them.
Source: NEW ADVENT BIBLE: Luke 24)

I've written about this Rheinberger's most well known piece before (see: J.G. Rheinberger: Abendlied — Dresdner Kreuzchor | Saturday Chorale), it's sung below by the choir of the Dortmund Choral Academy under their director Jost Salm. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

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