Robert Fayrfax (1464-1521): Magnificat super O bone Jesu

Fayrfax’s 5-part (treble, mean, contratenor, tenor and bass) setting of the Magnificat takes a now lost antiphon O bone Jesu(O good Jesus) as its starting point. It’s and alternatim setting with Fayrfax setting only the even-numbered verses leaving the odd-numbered ones as chant. Like most of his music it combines clarity with some very complex…

Robert Fayrfax (1464-1521): Antiphona Regali Ex Progenie

This very brief antiphon — the third antiphon at Vespers of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, is the cantus firmus for Fayrfax’s Mass setting Missa Regali Ex Progenie, the Mass which I’ll post at sometime in the future is an early work but is no less beautiful for that. enjoy :-). mfi

Robert Fayrfax (1464-1521): Most clere of colour

When we think of English renaissance sung music we tend to think in terms of the large-scale polyphonic music written for cathedrals, colleges, and the Chapel Royal. Certainly this music is worthy of our fullest attention but it would be a mistake to ignore the chamber-song repertory of the time. Much of it is both…

Robert Fayrfax (1464-1521): Magnificat (‘Regale’)

A Lincolnshire man, Robert Fayrfax (1464-1521) rose to be the  chief composer for Henry VII is best remembered for his settings of the Mass, but this highly successful English Tudor composer who  was awarded Oxford’s very first doctor of music degree wrote in many genres. We don’t know why he gave the title "Regale" to…

Robert Fayrfax (1464-1521) Aeternae laudis lilium

The title and first line of Fayrfax’s  five-part votive antiphon ‘Aeternae laudis lilium’ – “Aeternae laudis lilium, O dulcis Maria, te laudat” (“O gentle Mary, eternally the lily to be praised”), is a reference to Christian usage of the lily as as a symbol of chastity, innocence, purity and piety. Fayrfax and his audience would…