Feature: Alessandro Grandi (±1586 – 1630): Salve Regina

This wonderful setting of the Salve is a particularly fine example of what a talented composer does when confronted with artistic restrictions. Grandi was one of those composers who flourished in Venice during Monteverdi’s time and in his shadow. He’d held posts as a maestro di capella in Ferrara, and had previously sung and studied…

Leonardo Leo (1694 – 1744): Salve Regina in C minor

Leonardo Leo was more a composer of opera than of sacred music he had a distinguished career in Naples and was quite influential numbering Piccinni, Cafaro and Jommelli amongst his pupils. His sacred music makes good use of counterpoint can be quite operatic as you can hear in this live recording of his Salve Regina…

Johannes Ockeghem (±1410 –1497): Salve Regina

Ockeghem’s reputation during his lifetime was, as Timothy Dickey puts it, ‘stellar’ he was equally admired by his fellow musicians and his patrons amongst whom were numbered no less than three kings of France. His setting of the Salve which you can hear below with its dense and inventive polyphony woven around the chant melody…

Bayan Northcott (born 1940): Salve Regina

Bayan Northcott was born in Harrow on the Hill north west London in 1940 he read English at Oxford receiving a BA in 1962 and then worked as an English teacher for six years between 1964 and 1970. Musically self-taught he went to the University of Southampton where he studied composition under Alexander Goehr and…

Franchino Gaffurio (1451 – 1522): Salve Regina

Gaffurio is now remembered as a scholar and a theoretician rather than as a composer. He was very influential during his lifetime and for about a century after. He stands out as an Italian at a time when the choirs and musical ensembles of the courts, colleges, and cathedrals were dominated by composers from the…

Matthaeus Pipelare ( ±1450 — ±1515): Salve Regina

Pipelare’s setting of the Salve is an alternatim setting in which only the even-numbered verses are set. I think it must be a relatively early work because of its rhythmic use of syncopated short notes it’s a surprisingly varied setting that makes use of the old-fashioned technique of varying dense imitative writing with multipart passages.…

André Campra (1660–1744): Salve Regina

Campra’s setting of the Salve is one of his Petits Motets its style is very strongly reminiscent of an Italian cantata there’s the very expressive writing, the vocal repetition, the melismatic writing, and the presence of some quite florid passages. I think the opening with its expressive silences and the lovely melismas that can be…

Richard Davy (±1465-1538): Salve Regina

Davy was one of the first of the new generation of English composers who flourished under the Tudors. His setting of the Salve is free-composed throughout making no reference to the chant. It’s very distinctly English and quite unlike anything that his contemporaries in Italy, France or theLow Countries would have composed.  There’s a sweetness…