Heinrich Schütz (1585–1672): In lectulo per noctes

From 1609 to 1613 Schütz lived in Venice where he became the pupil of Giovanni Gabrieli who he admired all his life, for both personal and musical reasons. Although his great admiration of Gabrieli in particular and the Italian school of composition in general never faded Schütz  adopted their techniques and methods only when it…

Heinrich Schütz (1585–1672): Jauchzet dem Herren

To my mind Schütz is the most important composer in Germany before the advent of Johann Sebastian Bach. His family wanted him to be a lawyer but fortunately for him (and for us) in 1608 the Landgrave of Moritz gave him money to travel to Venice and study music under Giovanni Gabrieli. At that time…

Heinrich Schütz (1585–1672): Uppsala Magnificat SWV 468

Heinrich Schütz’s Latin setting of the Magnificat was one of a number of works discovered in the music collection in Uppsala University’s library it’s scored for four soloists, two four voice choruses, two violins, three trombones and continuo  and reflects Schütz’ studies in Italy. It’s clearly influenced by Monteverdi’s Magnificat setting in the 1610 Vespers…

Heinrich Schütz (1585 – 1672): Selig sind die Toten

This is one of the few of Schütz’s motets that is both well-known and to have attained lasting popularity. It was first published in 1648 in the collection of twenty-nine of Schütz’s motets called ‘Geistliche Chormusik‘ and is scored for  SSATTB, with continuo. These motets are important not only for their beauty but because they…