Robert Carver (fl 1484– 1567): O bone Jesu

Robert Carver (or Carvor) was an Augustinian monk whose compositions are the source of the Carvor Choir book. He was evidently musically very ambitious, as you can hear from his nineteen part motet  O bone Jesu (SSSAATTTTTTTTTTTBBB). It’s a very assured piece of music that illustrates in a quite spectacular manner how the English fondness…

Richard Davy (±1465-1538): Salve Regina

Davy was one of the first of the new generation of English composers who flourished under the Tudors. His setting of the Salve is free-composed throughout making no reference to the chant. It’s very distinctly English and quite unlike anything that his contemporaries in Italy, France or theLow Countries would have composed.  There’s a sweetness…

John Blow (1649 – 1708): I will hearken

The collapse of the Puritan regime and the restoration of the Stuart monarchy under Charles II in 1660 meant an immediate change in the style of government. Charles’ government immediate priority was restoring those institutions of state that the Puritans had destroyed and that included the Chapel Royal which had been a vital centre of…

Edmund Turges (?1450-????): From stormy windes

I can tell you very little about Edmund Turges we don’t know where or when he was born – although London around 1450 is a reasonably good guess. We know that he was admitted to the London parish clerks’ company of the Fraternity of St Nicholas between 1468 and 1470 and we know that his…

Felice Anerio (±1560-1614): Stabat Mater A12

From about 1610 a spirit of triumphalism could be heard in much of the music heard in the Sistine Chapel. There was a trend towards the use of massive vocal forces such as the Masse and Motets scored double and triple choirs (including basso continuo) composed by Vincenzo Ugolini, (1580 – 1638), maestro di capella…

Heinrich Suso (ca. 1295-1366): In Dulci Jubilo

Henrich Suso (or Seuse) was a German Dominican monk and mystic and follower of Eckhart whose writings both in German and Latin translation were widely read throughout Germany during the second half of the fourteenth and in the fifteenth century. Nowadays he’s mostly remembered for his macaronic carol ‘In Dulci Jubilo’ the story goes that…

Feature: John Taverner (±1490-1545): Leroy Kyrie

The name of Taverner’s setting of the Kyrie known as the ‘Leroy Kyrie‘ which you’ll also see written as ‘Kyrie Le Roy ‘ is generally believed to a reference to ‘Roy Henry‘, either Henry IV or – more likely, Henry V to whom some musical works are attributed in the Old Hall Manuscript. Simply by…

John Taverner (c1490-1545): Missa Mater Christi sanctissima

Taverner starts each movement of his Missa Mater Christi sanctissima with opening of his  antiphon "Mater Christi sanctissima" about which I wrote yesterday. It’s a very direct and up-beat setting that celebrates its subject. It’ also a later work which means it’s far less florid than his youthful compositions. Enjoy :-). markfromireland