Posts Tagged ‘ Thomas Tallis ’

Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Wipe away my sins, O Lord

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October 31, 2014

When the First Book of Common Prayer was introduced on Whitsunday, 9 June 1549 the need for a repertory of service music in the vernacular became urgent. One way of plugging the gap was to make use of what is known as a contrafactum (plural contrafacta) of which this is one.

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Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Alleluia. Ora pro nobis

1
June 24, 2014

Tallis' Alleluia. Ora pro nobis for four voices is a fairly early composition. It's a liturgical text intended to be sung during the the celebration of a Lady Mass (Lady Masses were daily celebrations of the Mass that used texts relating to the Blessed Virgin Mary) on Tuesdays between Pentecost and Advent. Enjoy :-)

markfromireland

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Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): A new commandment

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June 9, 2014

Tallis' A new commandment is another one of those neglected gems that are his English language anthems. It's a four-part setting and probably dates from about 1570. Its use of melisma means that its style is not quite as stark as that of his other English language anthems, perhaps that's why it's one of my favourites amongst those works. It's performed below by the Chapelle du Roi conducted by Alistair Dixon. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Mihi autem nimis

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May 20, 2014

Tallis' Latin motet Mihi autem nimis is based on an introit text and would have been sung on any any of the feasts dedicated to the Apostles or the conversion of St. Paul. It was published in the 1575 Cantiones Sacræ. Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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Thomas Tallis (±1505-1585): Candidi facti sunt

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April 23, 2014

Tallis'  Candidi facti sunt, is a responsory intended to be sung in honour of one or more Apostles, or an Evangelist, during Eastertide. Given that

  1. The Tudor monarchs took a close interest and usually participated in the royal household's religious observances for Feast days.

    and

  2. That the only Apostles or Evangelists whose feasts can fall within Eastertide are St. Mark (25 April) and Ss. Philip and James (1 May).

Candidi facti sunt must have been written for a year when one or other of those feasts coincided with some important political or diplomatic (court) occasion. Like all of his Latin hymns and responsories it's essentially a setting of the original plainchant melody and reflects its plainchant origins in that its performance involves alternating plainchant and polyphony with the polyphonic sections quoting the chant that they replace.  Enjoy :-).

markfromireland

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