Posts Tagged ‘ Vival­di Gloria RV589 ’

Sunday Playlist: Glorious Gloria

2
August 21, 2011

bachfest_leipzig_2011_bosehausThis Sunday's playlist, is a live-recording of a performance of Vivaldi's Gloria in D RV589 by the Thomanerchor (St Thomas Choir) Leipzig, conducted by Georg Christoph Biller given as the opening concert for the Leipzig 2011 Bach Festival . It's glorious. Wonderful orchestral accompaniment, the choir is in great form while the soprano soloists Paul Bernewitz (aged 13) and Luis-Leonard Fischer (aged 12) sing superbly as does Stefan Kahle (alto) all under the baton of Thomanchor's Kantor Georg Christoph Biller whose conducting brings this choir to new heights. Really I could babble for hours about the quality of the performance and the conducting but I don't want to put you off.

Vivaldi probably composed his Gloria in D RV589 in 1715 for the girls' choir of the Ospedale della Pietà a Venetian orphanage for girls. When I wrote about "Laudamus Te" back on July 31st 2011 I commented that the Vivaldi's composition "gives us an idea of how skillful the young singers at the Ospedale della Pietà girls orphanage in Venice for whom Vivaldi wrote the piece must have been". Vivaldi who spent most of his career at the Ospedale and composed vast quantities of choral and instrumental music for its charges was surely well aware of the pride it took in the musical education the Ospedale della Pietà gave the girls under its care and the quality of its orchestra and choir.

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

‪Laudamus Te‬

0
July 31, 2011

I've picked two performances for you of "Laudamus Te" from Vivaldis' "Gloria"   (RV589). The first is a relatively old video of a performance by Tewkesbury Abbey School. "Laudamus Te" is very typical of Vivaldi's music with its intertwined imitative scale passages and melodic lines all of which go to make good music that gives us an idea of how skillful the young singers at the Ospedale della Pietà girls orphanage in Venice for whom Vivaldi wrote the piece must have been. It's a remarkably passionate duet for soprano and mezzo-soprano in which the singers contend (and I mean that literally, contests between sopranos were a very popular musical entertainment in Vivaldi’s time). There are echoes as well of a bourrée, a vigorous and lively type of gavotte that had come to Italy from France by 1681. All of which is which makes the fluidity and clarity of this performance by Andrew Swait and Thomas Ooi the more laudable.

Click here to listen to the music and read the rest of the posting ...

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